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We Need Trustee Self-Policing

We Need Trustee Self-Policing

In Texas, a House of Representatives panel has found grounds for impeaching a regent of the University of Texas system. The regent, a gubernatorial appointee, has asked for an enormous amount of material related to the performance of the president of UT-Austin. He believes it is necessary to cull this information, but his critics characterize his requests as a witch hunt.

Today's blog post is taken from a column by AGB's president, Richard D. Legon, that first appeared in Inside Higher Ed. Visit their site to read the full text.

At the College of Charleston, board members selected as the next president a candidate who did not emerge from the formal search process. He is a politician whose name was advanced by the state legislature and who has never worked in higher education. While we wish this new president success, the willingness of policy makers to usurp the college’s board raises important issues about governance.

It’s difficult to ignore these incidents and the other less-than-effective work occurring in some of the boardrooms of our colleges and universities.

Such behavior shines a spotlight on America’s distinct form of higher education board governance: voluntary, citizen boards that oversee the work of colleges and universities. And it raises a fundamental question: Just how far does the authority of any one board member extend? Read more at Inside Higher Ed.

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